Illinois Department of Natural Resources

Minutes of the 191st Meeting
(subject to approval of Commission at 192nd Meeting)

Prairieview Education Center
McHenry County Conservation District
2112 Behan Road
Crystal Lake, IL 60014

Tuesday, August 8, 2006 - 10:00 a.m.

191-1) Call to Order, Roll Call and Introduction of Attendees

At 10:05 a.m., pursuant to the Call to Order of Chair Drucker, the meeting began.

Deborah Stone read the roll call.

Members present: Jill Allread, Harry Drucker, Ronald Flemal, Richard Keating,
Jill Riddell, Bruce Ross-Shannon, and John Schwegman.

Members absent: Mare Payne and Lauren Rosenthal.

Others present: Steven Byers, Judy Faulkner Dempsey, Chris Doogan (Intern) Bob Edgin, Randy Heidorn, Tom Lerczak, Kelly Neal, John Nelson, Debbie Newman, Kressa Piliponis (Intern), Debbie Reider, Kim Roman, Mary Kay Solecki, and Deborah Stone, Illinois Nature Preserves Commission (INPC); Maggie Cole, Penny Snyder, Bob Szafoni, Office of Resource Conservation, Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR); Greg Kelly, Matthew Schmidt, Nancy Williamson, IDNR; Randy Nyboer, Endangered Species Protection Board (ESPB) and Illinois Natural History Survey (INHS); Sue Dees, Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT); John Clemetsen, ESPB; Orrin Bangert, McHenry County Soil and Water Conservation District (MCSWCD); John Schroeder, McHenry County Land Foundation (MCLF); Elizabeth Kessler, Executive Director, John Kremer, Director of Operations, McHenry County Conservation District (MCCD); Jerry Paulson, INPC Consultant and Natural Land Institute (NLI); Jill Kennay, NLI; Jean Sellar, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE); Linda Balek and Lisa Haderlein, Land Conservancy of McHenry County; Joe Roth, CorLands; Ed Ellinghausen and Lorna Gladstone, Boone Creek Watershed Alliance; Valerie Spale, INPC Consultant and Save the Prairie Society; Ken Fiske, INPC Consultant; Jeanine Dammann, representing Spring Hill buffer addition to Boone Creek Fen Nature Preserve; Keith DuShane, representing McAndrews Glenn buffer addition to Boloria Meadows Nature Preserve; Fran Harty, The Nature Conservancy (TNC), representing additions to Sweet Fern Savanna Land and Water Reserve; John Lillard, representing Jean Farwell Woods Land and Water Reserve; Roger Mohr, City of Lake Forest, representing a buffer addition to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve; Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Swayne and family, representing Swayne Hollow Nature Preserve; Susan Van Der Bosch and Jane Wittig, Long Grove Park District, representing an addition to Reed-Turner Woodland Nature Preserve; Elizabeth Babcock, Barbara Fell, Darlene Fiske, George Johnson, Jim Keenan, Carol Rice, Jim Schneeberger, Becky Walkington, Val Wiken, and Al Wilson.
Chair Drucker stated the Commission would like to recognize Elizabeth Babcock. He stated that Mr. and Mrs. Babcock were pioneers in the conservation movement.

It was moved by Allread, seconded by Flemal, and carried that the following resolution be adopted:

The Illinois Nature Preserves Commission wishes to recognize the visionary efforts of Richard and Elizabeth Babcock in helping craft and implement the Real Property Conservation Rights Act, which was approved by State legislation on September 12, 1977. The Act enables private landowners to convey conservation easements to agencies of the State, local government, or not-for-profit organizations. The Babcocks’ Spring Hollow became the first private conservation easement in Illinois under the Act on December 29, 1977. Since that time, hundreds of other private citizens in Illinois have likewise granted conservation easements to forever protect the unique natural features of their land. The Commission further recognizes the Babcocks for their 1998 dedication of Spring Hollow as part of the Illinois Nature Preserve System.

(Resolution 1893)

Chair Drucker thanked the Boone Creek Watershed Alliance for hosting the INPC on August 7, 2006. He stated that this group has been instrumental in the protection efforts of many sites.

Chair Drucker also thanked the McHenry Conservation District (MCCD) for hosting the 191st Meeting of the INPC.

Elizabeth Kessler, Executive Director of the MCCD, stated that on behalf of the trustees of the MCCD, she would like to welcome the INPC. She stated that she has been with the MCCD for two months, and McHenry County is one of the fastest growing counties in Illinois. The MCCD is looking forward to doing wonderful things in regards to preservation, education, restoration, and acquisition to stay within the mission of the MCCD. She stated that the MCCD also looks forward to working with the various conservation partners.

191-2) Adoption of Agenda

Chair Drucker stated that a number of agenda items will be presented in a series because of their close proximity (Items 12, 14, 15, 23, and 24). Item 25 will also be presented once the landowners arrive.

It was moved by Ross-Shannon, seconded by Schwegman, and carried that the Agenda, as amended, be adopted.

Chair Drucker reported that at the 190th Meeting of the INPC, held at the Ballard Nature Center in Altamont, legal protection for ten tracts of land totaling 589.8 acres was approved by the Commission. Five of the areas, totaling 153.5 acres, are owned by private individuals or not-for-profit corporations who donated the value of the protection agreement to the public. The dollar value of the tracts of private land is $4,890,000, based on conservative estimates of the fair market value of the land. This private land was permanently preserved without acquisition of the land by the State. Private lands protected without State acquisition at INPC’s 190th Meeting were: Lost Creek Marsh Nature Preserve, Clinton County; Schulte Woods Nature Preserve, Clinton County; an addition to Pembroke Savanna Nature Preserve, Kankakee County; an addition of buffer to Skokie River Nature Preserve, Lake County; and the Hermann Wildflower Farm addition of buffer to Edward L. Ryerson Nature Preserve, Lake County. Protection of this land came about because the Commission has nine staff in the field working with private landowners. There are now 331 dedicated nature preserves in 81 counties totaling 44,589.526 acres and 131 land and water reserves in 58 counties totaling 37,927.81 acres.

191-3) Approval of the Minutes of the 190th Meeting, May 2, 2006

It was moved by Allread, seconded by Schwegman, and carried that the Minutes of the 190th Meeting, May 2, 2006, be approved.

191-4) 2006 Meeting Schedule

192nd October 24, 2006, 10:00 a.m. Kankakee Elks Club, Aroma Park

191-5) Election of Officers - INPC Nominating Committee Report

Commissioner Flemal stated that the nominating committee was pleased to offer in nomination the following individuals: for Chair, Commissioner Ross-Shannon; Vice-Chair, Commissioner Riddell; and for Secretary, Commissioner Keating.

There were no other nominations from the floor.

It was moved by Flemal, seconded by Schwegman, and carried that the following Commissioners be elected as Officers of the Illinois Natural Preserves Commission: Bruce Ross-Shannon as Chair, Jill Riddell as Vice-Chair, and Dr. Richard Keating as Secretary.

Commissioner Drucker stated that it was a real honor and privilege to have been the Chair of the INPC and work with the Commissioners and staff. He stated that he followed in the big footsteps of Jill Allread, and he felt that Chair Ross-Shannon will do a great job .

Barbara Fell stated that Bruce Ross-Shannon works for one of the prestigious law firms in Rockford. She stated that Mr. Ross-Shannon was called upon by George Fell many years ago to help with some land dealings. Since that time, Mr. Ross-Shannon has done so much for preservation work. She felt that he is a pioneer. Mrs. Fell stated that John Schwegman was the first person that Mr. Fell hired for the Commission. She felt that it was wonderful to see Mr. Schwegman continuing his work.

Chair Ross-Shannon thanked Mrs. Fell for her comments. He also stated that he was honored and challenged, and he was looking forward to chairing the Commission. He stated that being a part of the work that the Commission does was a great honor.

191-6) Election of Advisors and Consultants

Commissioner Flemal stated that a list of the nominated advisors and consultants was on the Agenda under Item 6. Commissioner Flemal stated that the nominating committee was proposing to add Tom Clay, Executive Director of the Illinois Audubon Society, to the list of Consultants.

There were no additional nominations from the floor.

It was moved by Drucker, seconded by Schwegman, and carried that the following be elected as advisors to the Illinois Nature Preserves Commission: Dr. William Shilts, Dr. George Vander Velde, and Dr. Derek Winstanley, and the following be elected as consultants to the Illinois Nature Preserves Commission: Gerald Adelmann, Bruce Boyd, Marilyn Campbell, Tom Clay, John Comerio, Kenneth Fiske, Jerry Paulson, Dr. Kenneth Robertson, Valerie Spale, and John White.

191-7) INPC Staff Report

Randy Heidorn presented Tom Lerczak with a 15-year service award. He stated that before Mr. Lerczak came to the INPC, he worked for the Illinois Natural History Survey. Mr. Heidorn also presented Judy Faulkner Dempsey with a 20-year service award.

Mr. Heidorn stated that the INPC family has grown. Angella Moorehouse and her husband are proud parents of a little boy. Zed Moorehouse was born on August 1, 2006.

Mr. Heidorn presented the following staff report:

1. INPC Operations
a. Interns:
i. Mary Kay Solecki is supervising a Natural Heritage Intern, Beth Stapleton, who is volunteering as an intern with the INPC from April 1- August 31, 2006, as part of her Master’s Degree program at Eastern Illinois University. Ms. Stapelton is conducting plant surveys of several nature preserves and land and water reserves in east-central Illinois.
ii. Debbie Newman provided orientation for and worked with two Southern Illinois University-Carbondale biology interns (Chris Doogan and Kressa Piliponis) working with the INPC and the IDNR this summer.
b. Staff continue to do extra administrative duties including coordination of
i. the purchase of four ATV trailers (Tom Lerczak and Bob Edgin).
ii. INPC herbicide orders (Tom Lerczak).
iii. review of preservation proposals for the agenda (Mary Kay Solecki).
c. Angella Moorehouse will be on family medical leave starting in August, 2006. Her anticipated return will be in the fall. Her duties will be covered by a combination of Tom Lerczak, Debbie Newman, and John Nelson.

2. Training, presentations and Meetings Attended
a. Deborah Stone, Kelly Neal ,Tom Lerczak, and Randy Heidorn completed mandatory National Incident Management System (NIMS) training in Springfield. Kim Roman and Bob Edgin completed the required NIMS course work on line.
b. Steven Byers:
i. provided a PowerPoint presentation entitled "LAKEFRONT BIODIVERSITY" for the Highland Park Lakefront Summit. The purpose of the Lakefront Summit was to bring together stakeholders to discuss the aesthetics, ecological significance, and wise use of the lake front in the City of Highland Park. The meeting included private landowner/citizen participation. Representatives of the IDNR, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Great Lakes Alliance, Highland Park Park District, and Lake County Forest Preserve District also spoke.
ii. attended a groundwater protection workshop at McHenry Community College on May 5, 2006.
c. Debbie Newman:
i. assisted with landowner contact and field trip for Bohm Woods acquisition press event.
ii. wrote an article about INPC programs for the CLIFFTOP newsletter.
iii. provided advisement to Principia College about an upcoming hill prairie conference.
d. Judy Faulkner Dempsey set up a series of three meetings over two days with Elizabeth Cisar from Clean Energy Foundation to get more projects initiated and find partners in southern Illinois.

3. Inventory and Monitoring
a. Debbie Newman and Tom Lerczak conducted breeding bird surveys in their areas.
b. Several staff attended the quarterly Natural Areas Evaluation Committee meeting.
c. Angella Moorehouse:
i. completed extensive plant survey work at two INAI sites, Rice Algific Slope in Jo Daviess County and Detweiller Riverfront Prairie in Peoria County resulting in the INAI Category I recognition for both sites.
ii. assisted in fish surveys at the La Moine River INAI site in Schuyler County to evaluate whether the stream segment still qualifies for the INAI as a high- quality stream (results pending).
iii. coordinated the third annual Fourth of July Butterfly Counts on four nature preserves and one land and water reserve.
d. Bob Edgin conducted royal catchfly (Silene regia) monitoring at five sites.

4. Protection Program Activities
a. Staff worked on proposals included on the agenda for the 191st INPC meeting.
b. Steven Byers provided a PowerPoint presentation for the President and Board of Forest Preserve District of Cook County (FPDCC) Commissioners entitled "PRESERVING THE BEST OF THE LAST." The presentation provided a brief overview of land preserved state-wide by the INPC and specifically the six-county region of northeastern Illinois. The FPDCC has dedicated 16 sites totaling 4,335 acres. The presentation also provided an overview of the benefits of preserving land with the INPC. The Commissioners adopted a resolution to present seven additional sites, totaling 3,360 acres, to the Commission for dedication as part of the Illinois Nature Preserves System. Those sites included Powderhorn Marsh, Greek Lake Savanna, Calumet City Prairie, Deer Grove, Black Partridge Fen, Tinley Creek Woods, and McMahon Fen.
c. Debbie Newman worked on a hill prairie initiative with IDNR staff.
d. Bob Edgin conducted five landowner contacts.
e. Judy Faulkner Dempsey made the following landowner contacts:
i. Bill Gonterman on several properties.
ii. Gillespie tract issues.
iii. worked with Jody Shimp (IDNR) on landowner contact plans.
iv. helped with Collier Limestone Glade landowner contact plans.

5. Land Acquisition: Debbie Newman continued coordination of protection of four INAI parcels through private/IDNR acquisition.

6. Defense Program
a. A wetland fill violation that was reported at Black Crown Marsh to the Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) by INPC and IDNR staff in 2002 has been resolved. The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois ruled on May 2, 2006, that the defendants (Greg LaPlante, et al.) committed violations of the Clean Water Act when they excavated and caused fill to be discharged into "Waters of the U.S." A civil penalty of $300,000 was imposed unless the area is restored to the satisfaction of the ACOE, in which case the civil penalty will be reduced to $27,500. Brad Semel and John Nelson testified at trial and provided the U.S. Attorney General's Office with biological and hydrologic connectivity information that was important in this case. Staff from several environmental consulting firms and the ACOE also testified at trial. This outcome represents important case law as it supports the ACOE jurisdiction over wetlands connected to navigatable waters, even if such wetlands are at considerable distance and the connection is through man-made culverts and drainage ways.

b. Site Threats Report

i. Site: Fel-Pro Triple R Fen Nature Preserve, McHenry Co. - Steven Byers
Issue: Proposed residential development (32 units on 28.359 acres) adjacent to both Fel-Pro Triple R Fen Nature Preserve and Detrana Fen INAI site.

Threat: Direct impact to surface hydrology (from sheet flow to single point discharge and associated sedimentation, changes in discharge rates) and potential impact to groundwater resource.

Status: New - INPC staff prepared a letter for and attended the Village of Cary Board of Zoning, Planning, and Appeals meeting on June 23, 2006, regarding the proposed re-zoning and annexation of the Wynstone Hills development. Because of the issues/concerns raised at that meeting by Commission staff and the McHenry County Conservation District, the motion to approve this development was tabled. Commission staff met with the developer, Village of Cary, consultant, and McHenry County Conservation District on July 12, 2006, to address the issues raised regarding the importance of protecting the fen wetland from changes in surface hydrology and the importance of protecting the groundwater resource. The McHenry County Stormwater Management Ordinance requires that McHenry County Advanced Identification (ADID) wetlands (which includes Detrana Fen) shall have a buffer of 100 feet, the buffer shall be managed as if it were part of the natural area, and the proposed development must "...meet the terms and conditions specified during consultation with the IDNR or U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service pursuant to state and federal laws and regulations." The consultant initiated consultation with the IDNR on May 5, 2006. On July 13, 2006, the Village of Cary Board of Zoning, Planning, and Appeals approved the project, subject to the requirements of the McHenry County Stormwater Management Ordinance. Both the developer and the McHenry County Conservation District plan to install groundwater monitoring wells.

ii. Site: Wagner Fen Nature Preserve, Lake Co. - Steven Byers

Issue: Proposed residential development (71 houses) on 109.3 acres next to the Nature Preserve.

Threat: Direct impact to surface hydrology (from sheet flow to single point discharge and associated sedimentation, changes in discharge rates) and potential impact to groundwater resource.

Status: Resolved - The Village of Lake Barrington, in a special meeting on May 17, 2006, approved this development. The consultation process included over 20 individuals from 13 organizations. Their input resulted in an increase of the buffer width from 20 feet to 100 feet to an average of 150 feet. Road run-off will be directed away from the fen, and some rainwater (from downspouts) will be directed toward the fen. The consultation process failed to address the importance of designating outlots, as opposed to conservation easements on individual lots, failed to address the issues/problems associated with septic fields, and failed to reduce the density of units in the mature oak woodlands overlooking the Nature Preserve.

iii. Site: Illinois Beach Nature Preserve, and North Dunes Nature Preserve, Illinois Beach State Park, Lake Co. - Steven Byers/Randy Heidorn

(1) Issue: High-density residential development adjacent to Illinois Beach State Park (IBSP) along Wadsworth Road.

Threat: The proposed development will alter surface hydrology (from sheet flow to single discharge point) and poses threat to water quality and flow rates entering IBSP.

Status: Ongoing - On July 10, 2006, the Village of Beach Park approved a resolution authorizing the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) to transfer "jurisdiction" of Wadsworth Road to the Village and to authorize four access points along Wadsworth Road to accommodate residential and commercial development (gas station). IDNR representatives were present and conveyed once again that the IDNR owns 82 feet to either side of the center line of Wadsworth Road and that the IDNR would not approve access to Wadsworth Road.

(2) Issue: Asbestos contamination in the Nature Preserves.

Threat: Asbestos containing materials (ACM) are present on the beach and in the Nature Preserves. The ACM remnants are from old subdivisions and military bases that were acquired when IBSP was assembled or have been deposited on the beach from littoral drift from contaminated areas both north and south of IBSP. Beach erosion and management activities have exposed the ACM and made it visible. Methods need to be developed to protect the public from any significant human health risk, and at the same time, protect the rare resources within the Nature Preserves from loss.

Status: Ongoing - The University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health (UIC) has released the Final Report of Findings on IBSP: Determination of Asbestos Contamination in Beach Nourishment Sand. This report was commissioned by a task force created by Attorney General Lisa Madigan in May of 2003, to investigate reports of unsafe asbestos levels at IBSP. UIC concluded: "This screening risk estimate, using conservative (protective) worst-case assumptions, indicates risk levels that are less than the U.S. EPA level of one in one million excess cancer risk (by factors ranging from > 1000 for average or typical exposures to 6-40 for reasonable maximum estimates). This indicates that the true cancer risks to beach users at IBSP are less than the standard range of acceptable risk. It also indicates that nourishment sand from the North Point Marina and the Approach Channel to Waukegan Harbor, if applied to the beach, would not raise the risk above the U.S. EPA level of one in one million excess cancer risk." These findings are consistent with three earlier studies. A fifth study is also being conducted by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) looking at risks based on beach user activities. This study is expected to be completed by the end of the year.

The UIC report made the following recommendations: 1) A continuation and expansion of beach surveillance for, and pick-up of, ACM at IBSP that would include additional surveillance after inclement high wind and wave events and detailed record keeping of ACM findings and descriptions. 2) A review of IBSP visitor education efforts about ACM to determine effectiveness. 3) An ACM survey of areas that are impacted by erosion for the remains of housing infrastructure. If infrastructure that includes ACM is found, it should be remediated in accordance with applicable rules and regulations for asbestos abatement. 4) Exploration of other options for long-term beach nourishment and erosion management. In coordination with other state and federal agencies, the IDNR is developing a plan to remove asbestos as it becomes exposed by site management and beach erosion consistent with the reports recommendations. Tentatively, these will include sweeps of areas for ACM after completion of management and other ground or vegetation disturbing activities (ie prescribed burns).

Chair Ross-Shannon asked if the land, owned by the IDNR, on either side of Wadsworth Road at Illinois Beach is within the Nature Preserve.

Mr. Heidorn stated that it is within a natural area, but not within the Nature Preserve.

iv. Site: Bluff Spring Fen Nature Preserve, Cook Co. - John Nelson

Issue: Deep underground mining operation, industrial facilities, business park.
Threat: Impacts to the groundwater system that sustains Bluff Spring Fen.

Status: Ongoing - At the last Bluff Spring Fen Protection Plan Meeting on April 25, 2006, Vulcan Materials representatives and consultants informed the INPC that they could not achieve the 50 gallons per minute (gpm) maximum groundwater discharge to the mine portal specified in the Fen Protection Plan. In response, INPC staff requested Vulcan Materials to provide a realistic estimate of what can be achieved at the portal to reduce groundwater interception, as well as cost estimates. At the time of the meeting, Vulcan Materials reported that portal pumping was approximately 425 gpm.

Short-term mitigation intended to recover the groundwater elevations in the fen was implemented on June 22, 2006. Bluff City Materials designed and constructed a groundwater infiltration trench on its property south of the fen. Water is being pumped into this trench to provide some relief to the fen while a long-term solution is achieved. The effectiveness of this mitigation will be monitored during the next 3-6 months. The need for groundwater quality monitoring was emphasized as a response to this mitigation and Vulcan Materials and Bluff City Materials indicated a strong willingness to provide the INPC with the data and monitoring.

Staff participated in a Bluff Spring Fen meeting with INPC Director Deborah Stone on June 9, 2006, at the IDNR Region II headquarters in Bartlett. The meeting was planned to update Director Stone on the enforcement of the Fen Protection Plan and to summarize the history of the Commission’s efforts at this site as they relate to mining and groundwater protection. Staff present were: Randy Heidorn, Steven Byers, Kim Roman, and John Nelson.

v. Site: Piros Prairie Nature Preserve, Piros Prairie and Fen INAI site, Kyte River Bottoms INAI site, Ogle Co. - John Nelson

Issue: Proposed hog confinement facility - 1,920 animal units (4,800 actual pigs)

Threat: Potential impacts from animal waste land application to the groundwater system and surface waters of the natural areas in the vicinity.

Status: New - The Illinois Department of Agriculture has approved the siting of this facility near a tributary of the Kyte River and within 3/4 mile of Piros Prairie. Local residents, including Bob and Sherry Piros, petitioned the County Board to hold a public informational meeting on the matter according to provisions allowed under the Illinois Livestock Management Facilities Act. A petition with more than the required 75 registered voter signatures was filed with the County Clerk just prior to the deadline. The County Clerk found a typographical error on the petition which was then rejected, so the Department of Agriculture approved the facility as Ogle County did not request a hearing on the matter. Local residents are planning to hold their own informational meeting on July 25, 2006. All County Board members were invited.

vi. Site: Stone Bridge Reserve Land and Water Reserve, Winnebago Co. - John Nelson

Issue: Proposed sanitary sewer line expansion across the Stone Bridge Reserve Land and Water Reserve to service a new school and residential developments in Roscoe, Illinois.

Threat: Direct impacts to wetlands, Kinnikinnick Creek, railroad prairies and potential impacts to the federally listed prairie bush clover (Lespediza leptostachya).

Status: New - On July 6, 2006, INPC staff met with representatives of Roscoe Township and the local school district to discuss the proposal. A letter outlining the INPC concerns and permitting requirements was then sent to the school district and shared with other interested parties. The need for a detailed alternatives route analysis was emphasized.

vii. Site: Long Run Seep Nature Preserve, Will Co. - Kim Roman

Issue: Encroachment

Threat: A neighbor of Long Run Seep Nature Preserve made improvements to his parking lot and caused approximately five feet of encroachment upon the IDNR-owned site at its southern border. IDNR-owned fencing was mangled and buried. Soil, concrete, and other construction debris was also placed on the Nature Preserve. INPC staff met with the encroaching neighbor, and the encroachment/fencing was repaired to satisfaction.

Status: Resolved

viii. Site: Braidwood Dunes and Savanna Nature Preserve, Will Co. - Kim Roman

Issue: Exelon made public in December of 2005, releases of tritiated water from its Braidwood facility, (which the company had known about since 1996-97). Tritium is a radioactive material produced by nuclear reactors producing electricity. Exelon is permitted by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) to release tritiated water through four miles of pipe ("blow-down line") into the Kankakee River. The lawfully released tritium into the Kankakee River is expected to be diluted in the River (to legally permissible levels). While this is purposely and lawfully allowed to be released in this manner, a direct release of tritiated water into the groundwater is much more concentrated and may pose human health and environmental risks.

Threat: The INPC’s concern with this release is its potential impacts to Braidwood Dunes and Savanna Nature Preserve. Low levels of tritium have been detected at Sand Ridge Nature Preserve, however, with the information currently available, it is not a concern at this site. Levels of tritium at Braidwood Dunes and Savanna Nature Preserve have (barely) exceeded the IEPA’s established upper limit for safe drinking water. There is concern over what impacts these levels have on plants and animals; very little information on potential effects from such a release is available. Another concern is the potential remediation of the site; vacuuming the contaminated water table down so it can be released into the Kankakee River. A drastic and prolonged reduction in the water table could have major impacts to the natural communities within the Nature Preserve.

Status: New - The Forest Preserve District of Will County (FPDWC) (landowner) and the INPC have allowed for the installation of monitoring wells. The FPDWC has closed the site to the public and to its staff. Exelon has been regularly monitoring the groundwater and holding public meetings. IEPA modeling suggest that there should be no significant impact to the Nature Preserve’s groundwater. Jim Miner, with the Illinois State Geological Survey, is reviewing the groundwater data to assess potential impacts while the IDNR’s legal counsel is working with the Attorney General’s office to consider filing a complaint against Exelon under the Illinois Natural Areas Preservation Act. A meeting with the FPDWC, INPC, IDNR, and Exelon is scheduled.

ix. Site: Fults Hill Prairie Nature Preserve and nearby INAI sites, Monroe Co. - Debbie Newman

Issue: Proposed high power electrical utility lines through the karst area in southwestern Illinois.

Threat: Ameren Power Company is proposing a 37-mile, 150-foot wide corridor from Washington County to its Rush Island Plant in Missouri. All three of Ameren’s proposed route alternatives cross INAI sites with habitat and locations of several threatened and endangered species. Ameren’s preferred route also skirts Fults Hill Prairie Nature Preserve and National Natural Landmark. The proposed southern route crosses a few hundred feet north of Angela's Prairie Natural Heritage Landmark and Brickey-Gonterman Memorial Hill Prairie Nature Preserve. The INPC and the IDNR has raised concerns about these routes at the location where they cross the INAI sites and has subsequently had meetings with Ameren to discuss these concerns and urge some changes to the route.

Status: Ongoing - Since the INPC meeting on May 2, 2006, discussions and negotiations have continued between the INPC, IDNR, and Ameren. On May 5, 2006, a satisfactory conclusion was reached with Ameren agreeing to a slight alteration to its preferred route, which would thread the powerline down a hollow that is located between two INAI sites. While the optimum situation would have been locating the bluff crossing a few miles south, this compromise will allow Ameren to keep its preferred route, while traversing more crop field and minimizing impact to the nearby nature preserves, INAI sites, and planned preservation projects. However, Ameren and the Illinois Commerce Commission have entered into the public hearing/forum phase of the approval process. Quite a large number of individuals and local governments have filed as intervenors, with the majority seeking to have the route moved to the south. If this forces the powerline to be changed to the southern alternative route, the INPC may have to revisit the issue with Ameren since the current proposed southern route also stands to impact INAI and nature preserve sites.

x. Site: Salt Lick Point Land and Water Reserve, Monroe Co. - Debbie Newman

Issue: Unauthorized activity as the Village of Valmeyer, owner of the Land and Water Reserve, enlarged and extended an old logging road for an access trail without consultation with the INPC.

Threat: Potential for direct impacts to natural features within the protected area.

Status: The land and water reserve agreement provides for improvement of old trails in the Land and Water Reserve, however, it specifically states that it be done in consultation with and approval of INPC staff. Work is underway to sort this issue out with the Village.
xi. Site: Hybernia Nature Preserve - Steven Byers

Issue: Proposed residential development (three houses) on three lots that are located within the Hybernia INAI site that are enveloped by the Nature Preserve.

Threat: The proposed development (three lots) will have direct impacts to existing high-quality prairie and sedge meadow that support the federally listed eastern prairie fringed orchid (Platanthera leucophaea). In addition to destruction of habitat, development of these three lots and supporting roads (platted, but as yet unbuilt) will also adversely impact both the quantity (in terms of flow rates) and quality of surface water in this wetland basin. Sedimentation and impact on management protocols (controlled burning) are also threats posed by this proposed development.

Status: Ongoing - The INPC has been named a defendant in a lawsuit - Miller vs. City of Highland Park (Lake County, IL #06 MR 381). The INPC was added to the case pursuant to a court order and at the request of the owner of the Nature Preserve. The case involves the question of vacation of the road accessing the lots in question. This road was included in the nature preserve dedication of the site. If the road has not been vacated, the dedication may be subordinate to the rights associated with the road. The IDNR has sent a request to the Attorney General’s Office requesting Counsel to represent the INPC in this matter.

7. Stewardship Program
a. Volunteer Stewardship Network (VSN): Kelly Neal chaired the VSN Steering Committee Meeting on July 19, 2006, and coordinated the INPC purchase and distribution of equipment to the volunteers.
b. Involvement with other organizations:
i. Tom Lerczak and Randy Heidorn continued participation in the Landowner Incentive Program (LIP) Technical Advisory Committee.
ii. Kim Roman:
(1) obtained $7,000 from Commonwealth Edison to manage under its transmission line in Calumet City (adjacent to Superior Street Prairie Land and Water Reserve).
(2) coordinated a response with the IDNR to the proposed annexation of Mitchell’s Grove Nature Preserve to the city of LaSalle.
iii. Tom Lerczak
(1) attended the final IDOT meeting for Route 29 Environmental Impact Statement in Peoria on June 1, 2006.
(2) assisted Natural Resources Conservation Service and IDNR staff on a Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program project at the Sandra Miller Bellrose Nature Preserve.
c. Stewardship Planning:
i. Kelly Neal and Kim Roman met with Forest Preserve District of Will County staff to discuss research and management issues at Hickory Creek Barrens Nature Preserve and Thorn Creek Woods Nature Preserve.
ii. Kim Roman participated in The Nature Conservancy's mapping of conservation priorities in the Kankakee Sands.
iii. Angella Moorehouse:
(1) worked with IDNR staff to complete an updated management schedule for the 1,200-acre Cedar Glen macrosite involving two nature preserves (Cedar Glen Nature Preserve and Mississippi River Sand Hills Nature Preserve) and one land and water reserve (Cedar Glen Land and Water Reserve) recently acquired by the IDNR. This plan calls for the initiation of a deer harvest this fall.
(2) worked with Peoria Park District (PPD) and IDNR staff to design a compatible trail in Robinson Park Hill Prairies Nature Preserve. The PPD has received a grant from the IDNR’s Recreational Trail Program (RTP) to develop a hiking trail (phase 2 of 3) that will eventually extend a nine mile hiking trail through the Illinois River Bluffs linking Camp Wokanda to Detweiller Park and will provide access through two nature preserves (Robinson Park Hill Prairies Nature Preserve and Detweiller Woods Nature Preserve).
(3) prepared proposals for two grants that are on the tentative approval list: $139,000 for Wapello Land and Water Reserve Habitat Restoration and $90,000 for Siloam Springs/Buckhorn Macrosite/Private Lands Habitat Expansion and Improvement Project that includes Robert A. Evers Land and Water Reserve within Siloam Springs State Park.
iv. Dead and dying trees were noticed in early July, 2006, at certain areas within the Waterworks Hill Prairie Tract at Woodyard Memorial Conservation Area Land and Water Reserve. The dead and dying trees are located within a stewardship project area where the herbicides Garlon 4 and Stalker were used in the spring of 2005 to control a variety of exotic shrubs including winged wahoo (Euonymus alata) and bush honeysuckle (Lonicera spp.), using a basal bark application to the exotic shrubs. No obvious injury to untreated trees within the project areas was noticed until approximately a year after the herbicide was applied. It appears the trees may have been damaged inadvertently by the herbicide Stalker. There is at least one other known case were the active ingredient in Stalker resulted in off target tree death approximately one year after it was used to control unwanted brush in Michigan. Mary Kay Solecki and Bob Szafoni surveyed the damaged area, and Ms. Solecki is continuing to investigate. She took leaf samples of damaged trees to the University of Illinois Plant Clinic, and it was determined that the samples showed nothing symptomatic of disease or major insect problems. The University of Illinois Plant Clinic strongly suspects that herbicide moved off target and caused the injury. She will meet with the contractor who applied the herbicide to review his application method.
v. Debbie Newman:
(1) met with Godfrey Park District staff and John M. Olin Nature Preserve owner, The Nature Institute, to discuss lighting in a new park adjacent to the Nature Preserve;
(2) coordinated landowner approvals for leafhopper research on several hill prairies.
d. Stewardship Project Implementation:
i. Steven Byers:
(1) completed administration of eight stewardship contracts for restoration and management of ten different sites.
(2) is currently administering two habitat restoration projects with local county soil and water conservation districts, one IDNR C2000 grant for three sites, two IEPA 319 grants, one U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Landowner Incentive Program grant (orchid project) for eight sites, three Northeastern Illinois Wetland Conservation Grants for five sites, and close to $400,000 of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers mitigation funds held by Fox Valley Land Foundation ear-marked for eleven sites (six of which are dedicated nature preserves) in northeastern Illinois.
ii. Kim Roman implemented a $20,000 IDNR stewardship grant at Butterfield Creek Headwaters Land and Water Reserve.
iii. Angella Moorehouse completed the administration of four stewardship grants for FY06 which included brush clearing and exotic species control on two nature preserves and two land and water reserves. She continues to assist with two long-term stewardship grant projects (Rt. 96 Hill Prairie Project in Pike County and a Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program (WHIP) contract at Jamar Haven Land and Water Reserve in Hancock County.
iv. Debbie Newman coordinated NAAF, C2000, WHIP, Ecoteam, and volunteer stewardship projects on ten sites.
v. Judy Faulkner Dempsey completed administration of a stewardship contract for $5,600 for exotics control at Ren-Dill Shale Glade Nature Preserve and Halesia Nature Preserve.
e. Land Management Activities conducted by staff:
i. John Nelson performed management activities at nature preserves in McHenry County, including prairie seeding, herbiciding, and mowing.
ii. Kim Roman controlled exotic species at Superior Street Prairie Land and Water Reserve, Butterfield Creek Headwaters Land and Water Reserve, Short Pioneer Cemetery Prairie Nature Preserve, Wolf Road Prairie Nature Preserve, and Voight Pauper Cemetery Prairie Land and Water Reserve.
iii. Debbie Newman:
(1) worked on trash cleanup and sign posting at Prairie of the Rock Overlook Land and Water Reserve.
(2) posted signs at Sinking Creek Nature Preserve.
(3) finished language for a new Stemler Cave Woods Nature Preserve trail interpretive sign.
iv. Bob Edgin:
(1) posted boundary signs at two nature preserves and one land and water reserve.
(2) conducted invasive species control on three nature preserves, one land and water reserve and one natural heritage landmark.
v. Judy Faulkner Dempsey worked with a new stewardship volunteer on exotics control at Faulkner-Franke Pioneer Railroad Prairie Nature Preserve.

Deborah Stone presented information on the NAAF fiscal year (FY) budget issues. Ms. Stone stated that the Real Estate Transfer tax is allocated by statute, with one-half going to affordable housing, and one-half going to various open space and natural activities. Thirty-five percent is allocated to Open Space Land Acquisition and Development (OSLAD) grants that the IDNR gives primarily to local units of government. Fifteen percent is allocated to natural areas acquisition. Ms. Stone gave a brief PowerPoint presentation regarding the NAAF. She stated that three years ago slightly over $4 million was going to land acquisition, approximately $2.5 million for operations within the IDNR, $1.2 million for operation of the INPC, and approximately $450,000 for various stewardship and defense activities. There was a statutory transfer, done by the Legislature, that year from of the NAAF to the General Revenue Fund (GRF). In FY 06, uses out of the NAAF were growing, and for FY07, $5.1 million has been set aside for land acquisition. Just slightly over $3 million is allocated for operation of the IDNR, and the amount set aside for the INPC operation has grown slightly at $1.4 million. A total of $900,000 is set aside for a combination of defense and stewardship projects. Ms. Stone stated that $2 million has been appropriated out of the NAAF for the first year (of what is anticipated to be a three-year project) to update the Illinois Natural Areas Inventory (INAI). The first inventory was completed approximately 30 years ago. She stated that the Governor has made a three-year commitment to this project, but it is anticipated that some outside funds will be needed to make the project whole. The INAI is one of the responsibilities of the Commission. Ms. Stone stated that there was a $5 million statutory transfer from the NAAF to the GRF this year.

Commissioner Allread asked about the need to generate private dollars for the completion of the INAI update, and she asked if that amount had been determined.

Ms. Stone stated that an estimate has been generated that the total cost of the INAI update will be in the neighborhood of $6.5 million. The Governor has committed at least $4.5 million over the three-year period. There have discussions between the IDNR and at least one private foundation on how to raise additional funding, and there are ideas about others.

Ms. Stone stated that out of the INAI update funding, there will be a very small amount allocated to cover one staff person at the Commission.

Ms. Stone stated that the bulk of the INPC’s budget, approximately 78%, goes toward personnel. Contractual and operations are most of the rest. A reserve of $50,000 has been allocated, and often that reserve is released later in the year. Out of the contractual portion, it is hoped that the INPC can work with the IDNR to revive the resident program. Stewardship projects, are also a part of the contractual allocation.

Mr. Heidorn stated that travel expenses and commodity purchases come out of the operations portion of the INPC budget.

Commissioner Drucker stated that he would like to thank Ms. Stone for her hard work in trying to get additional headcount for the Commission.

191-8) IDNR Staff Report

Bob Szafoni presented the following staff report:

Natural Areas Evaluation Committee

The Natural Areas Evaluation Committee met in Springfield on June 27, 2006. Actions approved by the committee included:

Rice Algific Slope, Jo Daviess County - previously included on the INAI as a Category II site (listed species habitat); approved for addition of Category I, "best of its kind" site.

Harlem Hills, Winnebago County - approved boundary expansion to include addition of nature preserve and preserve buffer as dedicated at INPC’s 190th meeting.

Detweiler Riverfront Prairie, Peoria County - previously included on the INAI as a Category II site, approved for addition of Category I, "best of its kind" site.

Herrmann’s Woods, Lake County - approved boundary expansion to include Herrmann Wildflower Farm addition to the Edward L. Ryerson Nature Preserve as dedicated at INPC’s 190th meeting; added Category III for nature preserve status.

Skokie River, Lake County - approved boundary expansion to include all of Skokie River Nature Preserve, including the addition approved at INPC’s 190th meeting.

West Chicago Prairie, Du Page County - approved boundary expansion to include Truitt-Hoff Nature Preserve as dedicated at INPC’s 190th meeting; added Category III for nature preserve status.

Pembroke Savanna, Kankakee County - approved boundary expansion to include all of Pembroke Savanna Nature Preserve, as dedicated at INPC’s 190th meeting.
Sargent’s Woods, Coles County - approved boundary change to reflect logging and grazing damage to approximately 16 acres; those acres will remain on the INAI as buffer for the remaining grade B mesic upland forest.

Lost Creek Prairie, Clinton County - approved boundary expansion to include Lost Creek Marsh Nature Preserve and Schulte Woods Nature Preserve, as dedicated at INPC’s 190th meeting.

Land Acquisition

The IDNR acquired two new natural area tracts using the NAAF since May 2, 2006. The Foste tract at Sand Ridge State Forest in Mason County was acquired in June, 2006. This is a 197-acre parcel that provides habitat for two threatened species; regal fritillary and Illinois chorus frog. There are four INAI sites, a nature preserve, and a land and water reserve in the 7,400-acre State Forest.

The Miller tract at Black Crown Marsh in McHenry County was also acquired in June, 2006. This is a 40-acre addition to the IDNR’s 185-acre Black Crown Marsh State Natural Area. The marsh is included on the INAI as habitat for six endangered or threatened species of wetland dependent birds: black tern, least bittern, common moorhen, black-crowned night heron, sandhill crane and yellow-headed blackbird. One hundred fifty six acres of Black Crown Marsh are registered as a land and water reserve.

One hundred fifty six natural area tracts totaling 21,500 acres have been acquired with NAAF since the inception of the fund in 1989.

The IDNR acquired another important natural area using funds from a consent decree with Dynegy Corporation. Bohm Woods is a 92-acre site in Madison County included on the INAI as an excellent example of the original upland forest of southwestern Illinois. The new acquisition surrounds the William and Emma Bohm Memorial Nature Preserve, dedicated in 1982, the E. Dora Bohm Memorial Nature Preserve, dedicated in 1995, and the Toadwood Scrubs addition of buffer, dedicated in 1996. With this acquisition and the three privately owned nature preserves, the entire INAI site is now permanently protected. The area is adjacent to the campus of Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, and it is anticipated that its use will be for research and education.

Personnel Changes

Bob Szafoni has been promoted from his district biologist position to Natural Areas Inventory Project Manager, the position formerly occupied by Patti Reilly. Mr. Szafoni will continue to work from the Charleston office. He will be administering the many natural areas stewardship projects that are done each year, keeping the INAI up to date and handling other natural areas-related matters.

Wildlife Preservation Fund

Total contributions through the income tax check-off as of July 28, 2006, are just shy of $192,000; about $40,000 behind the same date last year. All continuing funds are down this year by $21,000 to $100,000. There appears to be a real decline in contributions and is probably related to the eight new funds on the 2005 IL-1040. Those eight new funds combined have received approximately $370,000; the eight continuing funds have received $366,000 less than last year.

191-9) Endangered Species Protection Board Staff Report

Randy Nyboer, Endangered Species Protection Board (ESPB) Manager, stated that the ESPB held its 131st meeting on August 4, 2006, at the IDNR headquarters in Springfield. The next meeting is scheduled for November 17, 2006, in Galena. A field trip at the Savanna Army Depot will be held on November 16, 2006.

Mr. Nyboer stated that each year there is an award of a $500 stipend, given through the Todd Fink Memorial, to a student at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) who is working with endangered species. The ESPB helps to select the winner of the award. This year’s winner is Ms. Chelsea DeBay, a master’s candidate student at SIUC. She is working on the effects of fire on small mammals with special emphasis on the golden mouse, which is a state-threatened species.

Mr. Nyboer stated that he has been working with Kathy Andrews , editor for Outdoor Illinois. There will be a special issue on endangered species in March, 2007. He stated that he has been writing and editing articles for that issue. The IDNR has decided to dedicate this special issue on endangered species to Carl Becker. Mr. Becker was the first executive director for the ESPB.

Mr. Nyboer stated that the final changes should be complete for the animal endangered species list in early September, 2006. Once the changes have been completed, the book will be sent for publication.

The ESPB, at its meeting on May 19, 2006, passed a resolution (#130-4) entitled, "Natural Areas Acquisition Fund transfers to the General Revenue Fund." The ESPB thought the transfers of the NAAF to the GRF should not have happened. The ESPB would like to see the Legislature reverse its decision because the transfers do not carry out the statutory responsibilities of the NAAF. A copy of the resolution, along with a letter from one of the ESPB members, went to all the members of the Legislature, the Governor, and the IDNR. It was the opinion of the ESPB that the NAAF dollars were critical for purchasing, managing, and protecting the State’s rare resources. The letter also mentioned not having a budget or permanent staff for the ESPB, and the money given to the GRF should have gone toward statutory responsibilities. He stated that the ESPB would appreciate the Commission’s support in this issue.

Commissioner Drucker stated that in light of the ESPB not having a budget, there was no money for staff to list the endangered species. The State is unable to comply with its own laws because there is no way to know which species are endangered.

Mr. Nyboer stated that the ESPB has a lot of dedicated board members, but it is not an easy project. Even with these dedicated individuals, a mandated program cannot function without a budget and staff.

John Clemetsen, ESPB, stated that he would like to thank Mr. Nyboer because he has filled in and done more and more with less and less.

Chair Ross-Shannon thanked Mr. Nyboer for his report. He stated that the Commission does appreciate the work of the ESPB.

Randy Heidorn stated that for the record that all the registration documents have been signed by the landowner prior to coming before the Commission as required by the administrative rule.

191-10) Fulton Co. – Addition to Kedzior Woodlands Land and Water Reserve, Registration

Tom Lerczak presented a proposal, developed by Angella Moorehouse, to register an addition to Kedzior Woodlands Land and Water Reserve. Ken and Dawn Kedzior propose to register in perpetuity a 33.66-acre addition to Kedzior Woodlands Land and Water Reserve in Fulton County. The proposed addition is located approximately 1,000 feet to the west of the current Land and Water Reserve and lies adjacent to the IDNR-owned Harper-Rector Woods Nature Preserve. At the 183rd INPC meeting held on August 3, 2004, the Commission granted preliminary approval for the dedication of this proposed land and water reserve addition and two other tracts owned by Ken and Dawn Kedzior as an addition to Harper-Rector Woods Nature Preserve (Resolution #1785). After additional biological data and information on a proposed IDOT road corridor that included a portion of the other two tracts was presented at the 188th INPC meeting on October 18, 2005, the Commission rejected final dedication approval for the three tracts (Resolution #1850). The Commission concluded that with its proximity to the Nature Preserve, this current proposed addition to Kedzior Woodlands Land and Water Reserve could be considered for an addition to Harper-Rector Woods Nature Preserve, however, the landowner has decided to register the site as an addition to the Land and Water Reserve. This addition lies within the Galesburg Section of the Western Forest-Prairie Natural Division of Illinois and contains moderate quality, grade C, dry-mesic and mesic upland forest communities. A portion of the proposed addition lies uphill from the Nature Preserve and would provide a buffer for drainage leading into the Nature Preserve. It would also protect additional habitat for the connection of the current Land and Water Reserve to the Nature Preserve and the Spoon River.

Mr. Lerczak stated that some of the allowable uses at this site are wildlife hunting, low impact camping, and use of standing and fallen dead wood for firewood. A forestry management plan will be developed with the IDNR district forester. This plan will include a selective harvesting of trees. The Kedziors also wish to occasionally remove a tree for their own personal use.

Chair Ross-Shannon stated that it was gratifying to see this on the Agenda.

It was moved by Allread, seconded by Schwegman, and carried, that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants approval for the registration of an addition to Kedzior Woodlands Land and Water Reserve in Fulton County, as described in the proposal presented under Item 10 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1894)

Chair Ross-Shannon asked Mr. Lerczak to convey to Mr. and Mrs. Kedzior the thanks and appreciation of the Commission.

191-11) Kankakee Co. - Additions to Sweet Fern Savanna Land and Water Reserve, Registration

Kim Roman presented a proposal to register two parcels as additions to Sweet Fern Savanna Land and Water Reserve. Sweet Fern Savanna, located in the Pembroke Savannas in Kankakee County, is an 89-acre registered Land & Water Reserve found in the Kankakee Sand Area Section of the Grand Prairie Natural Division. It is recognized on the INAI (#1581) for its high-quality dry-mesic sand savanna and for the habitat it provides for 13 state-endangered or threatened plants and the state-threatened regal fritillary butterfly (Speyeria idalia). While the majority of this site is currently owned and managed by Dr. Marianne Hahn, the Illinois Chapter of The Nature Conservancy (TNC) owns two parcels adjacent to the existing Land and Water Reserve. Both parcels, totaling 14.7 acres, are proposed to be registered in perpetuity as additions to Sweet Fern Savanna Land and Water Reserve.

It was moved by Riddell, seconded by Allread, and carried, with Drucker abstaining, that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants approval for the registration of additions to Sweet Fern Savanna Land and Water Reserve in Kankakee County, as described in the proposal presented under Item 11 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1895)

Chair Ross-Shannon thanked Fran Harty and TNC for their partnership with the INPC.

191-12) Lake Co. – Jean Farwell Woods (Portion of Lillard Parcel #1) Land and Water Reserve, Registration

Steven Byers presented a proposal to register Jean Farwell Woods Land and Water Reserve. John Lillard and the Paula Polk Lillard Trust would like to register a 11.192-acre parcel as the Jean Farwell Woods Land and Water Reserve. Located in the Morainal Section of the Northeastern Natural Morainal Division, this parcel is part of the Lillard parcel #1 which is adjacent to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve (INAI #1245) that was presented to the INPC for preliminary approval for dedication as nature preserve buffer at its 190th Meeting in May, 2006. At that meeting, the Commission tabled granting preliminary approval for dedication of Lillard parcel #1 because of the precedent the proposal would have established for grazing on a designated nature preserve buffer. Livestock grazing is allowed in registered land and water reserves, provided that this use has been identified in the management program, as it has for this proposed land and water reserve. The proposed Jean Farwell Woods Land and Water Reserve is subject to the terms of a conservation easement held by Lake Forest Open Lands Association that provides for "...the continuation of land use patterns existing at the time of this grant...", provides a list of prohibited uses, and lists a series of reserved rights. Horses will have access to the proposed land and water reserve consistent with the manner described in the conservation easement and management plan. Although much of the proposed land and water reserve is pasture, some mature oaks (Quercus spp.) do survive. This parcel is one of five parcels presented at the 191st Meeting of the INPC that will increase the amount of land formally protected at Middlefork Savanna from 581.8 acres to 602.954 acres.

Mr. Byers stated that the owner reserves the right to pasture horses on this parcel.

John Lillard stated that he and his wife have had the pleasure of living on this land for 35 years, and Frank Farwell has lived in this area for at least 50 years. Mr. Farwell’s late wife, Jean, loved these woods and spent a lot of time in the woods. He stated that both families have horses and have ridden them a lot. Between the two families, nine children have been raised here. Both families want to see the land protected in perpetuity. He stated that there is a small strip of property between the Lillard parcel and the Farwell parcel that is owned by the City of Lake Forest. Roger Mohr, City of Lake Forest, worked to get that parcel protected, and it is on the INPC Agenda.

Chair Ross-Shannon thanked Mr. Lillard for his comments.

It was moved by Drucker, seconded by Keating, and carried, that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants approval for the registration of Jean Farwell Woods in Lake County as an Illinois Land and Water Reserve, as described in the proposal presented under Item 12 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1896)

191-13) Crawford Co. – Emma Vance Woods Nature Preserve, Dedication
(Actually presented after Item 24)

Bob Edgin presented a proposal for preliminary dedication for Emma Vance Woods as a nature preserve. The Board of Trustees of the Illinois Eastern Community College District #529 requests preliminary approval for dedication of 41 acres as Emma Vance Woods Nature Preserve. The site is located in the Effingham Plain Section of the Southern Till Plain Natural Division and is included on the INAI for the presence of 11.7 acres of grade B dry-mesic upland forest and 8.5 acres of grade B mesic floodplain forest (#1735). The site also contains 20.8 acres of successional floodplain forest. Protection is made possible by a donation of the property by Nellie Morris Miles to The Nature Conservancy (TNC) in 1976. TNC transferred the property to the Board of Trustees of the Illinois Eastern Community College District #529 in 1982. The nature preserve will be named in honor of Mrs. Miles’ mother, Emma Vance Morris.

It was moved by Flemal, seconded by Keating , and carried that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants preliminary approval for the dedication of Emma Vance Woods as an Illinois Nature Preserve in Crawford County, as described in the proposal presented under Item 13 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1897)

191-14) Lake Co. – Buffer Addition to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve, Dedication
(Actually presented after Item 15)

Steven Byers presented a proposal for preliminary approval for dedication of a buffer addition to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve. The City of Lake Forest wishes to dedicate a 0.3-acre parcel as nature preserve buffer for Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve. Located in the Morainal Section of the Northeastern Natural Morainal Division, this parcel is between two parcels (Lillard parcel #2 and Farwell parcel) that were conferred preliminary approval for dedication at the Commission’s 190th Meeting in May, 2006, and includes elements of mesic forest and dry-mesic forest (INAI #1245) that extend east from Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve. The City of Lake Forest reserves the right to maintain an existing water line that was installed approximately 75 years ago and install other public utilities and services as provided for in a preexisting easement. This parcel is one of five parcels presented at the 191st Meeting of the INPC that will increase the amount of land formally protected at Middlefork Savanna from 581.8 acres to 602.954 acres.

Commissioner Drucker stated that it was his opinion that this is admirable and amazing that since the last meeting of the INPC, Mr. Byers was able to determine the ownership of this parcel and get the City of Lake Forest to put this package together.

Roger Mohr, City of Lake Forest, stated that the people who really made this happen are Frank Farwell and John Lillard. Even though this parcel is only 0.3 acres in size, it does create continuity between the other two parcels. He felt this was a positive thing for the City of Lake Forest because it may encourage other residents in the area to join in this effort to create larger parcels of dedicated land.

Chair Ross-Shannon stated that it is encouraging to the Commission to see that kind of partnership that has been worked out with the citizens of Lake Forest.
It was moved by Allread, seconded by Schwegman, and carried that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants preliminary approval for the dedication of a buffer addition to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve in Lake County, as described in the proposal presented under Item 14 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1898)

191-15) Lake Co. – Jean Farwell Woods Addition of Buffer (Portion of Lillard Parcel #1) to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve, Dedication
(Actually presented after Item 12)

Steven Byers presented a proposal for preliminary approval for dedication of the Jean Farwell Woods addition of buffer to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve. Mr. John Lillard wishes to dedicate a 1.5-acre parcel as nature preserve buffer to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve. This 1.5-acre parcel is a portion of Lillard parcel #1 that is not grazed. While this parcel is subject to a conservation easement that recognizes the right of the owner to maintain "...the continuation of land use patterns existing at the time of this grant..." the operative phrase "...at the time of the grant," will be construed to reflect that horses currently do not and will not have access to this proposed addition. The proposed addition includes surviving elements of mesic savanna (INAI #1245) that extend from Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve and transition into dry-mesic forest. This parcel, located in the Morainal Section of the Northeastern Natural Morainal Division, is part of Lillard parcel #1 located adjacent to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve that was presented to the INPC for preliminary approval for dedication as nature preserve buffer at its 190th Meeting in May, 2006. At that meeting, the Commission tabled granting preliminary approval for dedication of Lillard parcel #1 because of the precedent the proposal would have established for grazing on a designated nature preserve buffer. This parcel is one of five parcels presented at the 191st Meeting of the INPC that will increase the amount of land formally protected at Middlefork Savanna from 581.8 acres to 602.954 acres.

It was moved by Keating, seconded by Drucker, and carried that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants preliminary approval for the dedication of the Jean Farwell Woods addition of buffer to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve in Lake County, as described in the proposal presented under Item 15 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1899)

191-16) Lake Co. – Nature Preserve Addition to Reed-Turner Woodland Nature Preserve, Dedication
(Actually presented after Item 13)

Steven Byers presented a proposal for preliminary approval for dedication of an addition to Reed-Turner Woodland Nature Preserve. The Village of Long Grove wishes to dedicate a 2.216-acre parcel as an addition to Reed-Turner Woodland Nature Preserve. This parcel is located in the Northeastern Morainal Natural Division, adjacent to Reed-Turner Woodland (INAI #228) and will further consolidate a protected landscape between Reed-Turner Woodland Nature Preserve and the Heron Creek Forest Preserve. The proposed addition includes elements of grade C dry-mesic forest and mesic forest that were part of a surviving 45-acre woodland referenced by the Commission at its 42nd Meeting in 1972. At that time, the Commission encouraged Harold and Barbara Turner to preserve a portion of those woods (Resolution #243). Then, in 1980, the Commission conferred final approval for dedication of 32 acres as the Reed-Turner Woodland Nature Preserve (Resolution #559). Since then, the Commission has also approved a master plan for this site (Resolution #637) and two additions that have increased the size of Reed-Turner Woodland Nature Preserve from 32 to 36 acres. This proposed addition will protect suitable habitat for the state-listed pale vetchling (Lathyrus ochroleucus) and increase the size of Reed-Turner Woodland Nature Preserve from 36 to 38.216 acre, thereby protecting much of the original 45-acre woodland referenced by the Commission in 1972.

Mr. Byers stated that the Village of Long Grove reserves the right to provide for recreational amenities to include a passive trail system that may ultimately provide a linkage to Heron Creek Forest Preserve. He stated that he will be working with the Village of Long Grove to provide a trail system that is compatible with Reed-Turner Woodland Nature Preserve and the linkage to Heron Creek Forest Preserve.

It was moved by Riddell, seconded by Flemal, and carried that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants preliminary approval for the dedication of an addition to Reed- Turner Woodland Nature Preserve in Lake County, as described in the proposal presented under Item 16 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1900)

Chair Ross-Shannon asked Mr. Byers to convey the thanks of the Commission to the Village of Long Grove.

191-17) McHenry Co. – McAndrews Glen Buffer Addition to Boloria Meadows Nature Preserve, Dedication
(Actually presented after Item 25)

John Nelson presented a proposal for preliminary approval for dedication of the McAndrews Glenn buffer addition to Boloria Meadows Nature Preserve. Legacy Homes of Crystal Lake proposes to dedicate approximately 6.4 acres as buffer addition to Boloria Meadows Nature Preserve. Boloria Meadows (INAI #1705) is a 36-acre site purchased by the Boone Creek Watershed Alliance in 2003. The purchase of the property was part of a conservation development plan for the McAndrews Glen residential subdivision in the Village of Bull Valley. During the subdivision plat review process and crafting of an annexation agreement with the village, the developer of McAndrews Glen agreed to incorporate conservation design principals to protect the on-site natural areas. A significant change to the original development plan was the reduction of home sites from 90 to 30 clustered home sites and the sale of the high-quality natural area to the Boone Creek Watershed Alliance. Legacy Homes now requests the dedication of 6.4 acres of restored open space land within the subdivision as buffer addition to Boloria Meadows Nature Preserve. The proposed buffer, located in the Morainal Section of the Northeastern Morainal Natural Division, borders the eastern boundary of the Nature Preserve and is in the initial stages of prairie and woodland restoration. The proposed buffer also provides the only public access to the Nature Preserve. The purchase of the property was accomplished with the assistance of the IDNR’s C2000 program.

It was moved by Keating, seconded by Drucker , and carried that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants preliminary approval for the dedication of the McAndrews Glenn buffer addition to Boloria Meadows Nature Preserve in McHenry County, as described in the proposal presented under Item17 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1901)

191-18) McHenry Co. – Spring Hill Buffer Addition to Boone Creek Fen Nature Preserve, Dedication
(Actually presented after Item 16)

John Nelson presented a proposal for preliminary approval for dedication of the Spring Hill buffer addition to Boone Creek Fen Nature Preserve. Alan and Jeanine Dammann propose to dedicate approximately 9 acres of land, located in the Morainal Section of the Northeastern Morainal Division, as the Spring Hill Buffer Addition to the Boone Creek Fen Nature Preserve. The proposed buffer addition consists of dry-mesic upland forest and seep natural communities. The buffer addition is adjacent to the 465-acre Boone Creek Fen and Seep INAI site (#1015) and is located within a ground watershed that has been designated as a Class III Special Resource Groundwater by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and Illinois Pollution Control Board. This site is one of the finest examples of graminoid fen and seep wetlands within the State. The entire natural area is under private ownership, and its protection has long been recognized as a worthy goal by many local landowners. The proposed buffer addition is a continuation of efforts by local landowners to create a "macro-preserve" that encompasses as much of the Boone Creek Fen and Seep Natural Area and associated recharge zones as possible.

Jeanine Dammann stated that it is her wish that the area will be protected in perpetuity.

It was moved by Keating, seconded by Allread , and carried that the following resolution be adopted:
The Commission grants preliminary approval for the dedication of the Spring Hill buffer addition to Boone Creek Fen Nature Preserve in McHenry County, as described in the proposal presented under Item 18 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1902)

A lunch break was taken from 12:20 - 1:00 p.m.

191-19) McLean Co. – Merwin Savanna Nature Preserve and Nature Preserve Buffer, Dedication
(Actually presented after Item 17)

Tom Lerczak presented a proposal for preliminary approval for dedication of Merwin Savanna Nature Preserve and nature preserve buffer. Merwin Savanna, owned by the ParkLands Foundation, is an approximately 83-acre site. The site includes the 61.5-acre ParkLands Foundation Merwin Preserve Natural Area (INAI #1734), recognized on the INAI for an 11-acre, grade C, "best-of-its-kind," dry-mesic, black-soil savanna. A single 35-acre tract is being proposed for dedication as a nature preserve. This tract contains the 11-acre savanna, 10.5 acres of grade C dry-mesic upland forest, plus peripheral areas supporting upland and bottomland forest. A 0.75-acre hill prairie remnant, listed as a notable feature on the INAI, occurs on the southward-facing river bluffs. Approximately 48 acres in two wooded tracts adjacent to the proposed nature preserve tract (12 acres on the west and 36 acres on the north) are being proposed as nature preserve buffer. Each of the two tracts contains a small gravel parking area. Most of the north buffer tract is listed on the INAI as grade D upland forest. This area contains some of the oldest bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) trees on the site, and its savanna structure is being restored by thinning woody plants and conducting prescribed burns. The southern boundary of the proposed nature preserve and buffer is defined by the centerline of the Mackinaw River, which is a 0.6-mile reach of the Mackinaw River Natural Area (INAI #788). Natural communities at the Merwin Savanna are representative of the Grand Prairie Section of the Grand Prairie Natural Division.

Mr. Lerczak stated that ParkLands Foundation has been conducting deer management at the site for several years, and they would like to continue that following the guidelines of the INPC. They also plan to reintroduce plant species into the buffer areas and into the savanna following the 1992 policy by the INPC.

Mr. Lerczak stated that ParkLands Foundation also wishes to retain the option of doubling the size of the parking lots as the site gets more visitation. The west side parking lot is now 4,500 square feet, and they wish to retain the option of making it 9,000 square feet. All of this activity would remain in the buffer area. The north parking lot is currently approximately 800 square feet, and they may want to increase the size to 1,600 square feet. There is a trail system throughout the site, and that will continue to be maintained. ParkLands Foundation wishes to prohibit pets, vehicles, bikes, skateboards, camping, open fires, collecting, and fishing.

Commissioner Keating asked if it would be a gravel parking lot.
Mr. Lerczak stated that they are gravel parking lots.

It was moved by Allread, seconded by Flemal, and carried that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants preliminary approval for the dedication of Merwin Savanna in McLean County as an Illinois Nature Preserve, as described in the proposal presented under Item 19 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1903)

191-20) Peoria Co. – Peoria Wilds Preserve Buffer Addition to Detweiller Woods Nature Preserve,
Dedication

Mary Kay Solecki presented a proposal, prepared by Angella Moorehouse, for preliminary approval for the dedication of the Peoria Wilds Preserve buffer addition to Detweiller Woods Nature Preserve. The proposed 21.85-acre Peoria Wilds Preserve is owned by Harry and Sara Stone of Peoria. Mr. and Mrs. Stone are seeking to dedicate the area as a buffer addition to Detweiller Woods Nature Preserve. The Nature Conservancy currently holds a perpetual conservation easement on the entire 25.6-acre area owned by the Stones. The proposed buffer addition is located on the western edge of the Grand Prairie Section of the Grand Prairie Natural Division. The site lies immediately north of the 706-acre Detweiller Park and within 300 feet from the northeast corner of Detweiller Woods Nature Preserve. The proposed buffer addition includes 7.4 acres of dry-mesic and mesic upland forest contiguous with the upland forests of Detweiller Park (INAI #208), two small grade C/D glacial drift hill prairies, and a 14.4-acre upland prairie restoration planted in 1993. Hydrological drainage from a portion of Detweiller Woods Nature Preserve and Detweiller Park flows through the proposed buffer addition and south through the Detweiller Riverfront Prairie INAI site (#1733). The upland forests also provide additional habitat for forest sensitive breeding birds that breed within the 10,000-acre Peoria Bluff Legacy Area, an extensive corridor of wooded blufflands, hill prairies, and river floodplain extending north of the city of Peoria. The proposed buffer addition will increase the size of Detweiller Woods Nature Preserve from 246 acres to 267.85 acres.

Commissioner Drucker asked who is primarily responsible for monitoring compliance with the easement in a case where TNC has an easement on the property and the State has a further easement.

Ms. Solecki stated that the primary responsibility currently resides with the current easement holder, TNC. Once it becomes a dedicated nature preserve, both the State of Illinois (INPC) and TNC have responsibility. Each easement holder will have responsibility for maintaining and monitoring their holdings at the nature preserve. In theory, both the INPC and TNC would work together to monitor the site in tandem because the terms of the easements are very similar.

Commissioner Drucker stated that he was thinking in terms of the cost of monitoring the easement.

Chair Ross-Shannon stated that both parties would have a legal obligation to look after their own easement, but both organizations could work out a plan to coordinate the management.

Randy Heidorn stated that from a practical point of view, when there is a dedication of a site that already has another layer of protection, the landowner gets to choose who will be the custodian. The custodian can very often be the holder of the other easement or could be the INPC. The site gets put into the INPC’s system of monitoring, and the annual report becomes an important tool.

It was moved by Allread, seconded by Keating, and carried, with Drucker abstaining, that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants preliminary approval for the dedication of the Peoria Wilds Preserve buffer addition to Detweiller Woods Nature Preserve in Peoria County, as described in the proposal presented under Item 20 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1904)

Chair Ross-Shannon stated that the one issue that the Commission will have to deal with more and more is that over time, there will be a tipping between the amount of land to be acquired and preserving what has been acquired. There is not enough money to cover the protection and stewardship of the sites. It was his opinion that this was going to be the biggest challenge that the Commission will face over the next 20 years.

Chair Ross-Shannon asked Ms. Solecki to thank Mr. and Mrs. Stone and to invite them to the 192nd Meeting of the INPC.

191-21) Madison Co. – Bohm Woods Nature Preserve, Dedication

Judy Faulkner Dempsey presented a proposal for preliminary dedication of Bohm Woods as a nature preserve. The approximately 92-acre Bohm Woods is owned by the IDNR and is considered to be the best remaining example of mesic and dry-mesic upland forest located in the Glaciated Section of the Middle Mississippi Border Natural Division. The INAI describes Bohm Woods (#184) as containing very high-quality upland forest and identified three natural communities, totaling 83 acres, within the boundaries of the woods. The three natural communities found at Bohm Woods include grade A mesic upland forest, grade B and C dry-mesic upland forest, and grade C wet bottomland forest. In 1981, the INPC approved in principle the dedication of the entire 83 acres of Bohm Woods INAI site as an Illinois Nature Preserve (Resolution #592). In 1982, Dora Bohm dedicated the northwest 10.3 acres of Bohm Woods as the William and Emma Bohm Memorial Nature Preserve. In 1995, Dora Bohm’s family dedicated the northeast 6.14 acres of the woods as the E. Dora Bohm Memorial Nature Preserve. In 1996, an addition of buffer to the E. Dora Bohm Memorial Nature Preserve, known as Toadwood Scrubs addition as buffer, was dedicated by neighbors John and Kay Kendall. With the proposed dedication, the entire INAI site will be protected.

Ms. Faulkner Dempsey stated that this site is now in Debbie Newman’s territory, however, it was part of her territory for 17 years. Ms. Faulkner Dempsey stated that she did the initial three dedications. She stated that once this was transferred to Ms. Newman’s territory, Ms. Newman worked very hard with the people who sold this land to the IDNR, keeping them primed for preservation. When the land was sold to the IDNR, the landowners insisted that it be dedicated as a nature preserve.

Debbie Newman stated that when this land first went up for sale approximately four years ago, a developer had a contract on the property. Ultimately, the developer’s contract expired. She stated that Ms. Faulkner Dempsey spent a lot of time working in this area, and her contacts with the owner of the E. Dora Bohm Nature Preserve laid the foundation for the further protection of this area.

Ms. Faulkner Dempsey stated that this land is very valuable in terms of development because it is directly across the street from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. She felt that it was remarkable that this land was able to be preserved.

It was moved by Schwegman, seconded by Flemal, and carried that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants preliminary approval for the dedication of Bohm Woods in Madison County as an Illinois Nature Preserve, as described in the proposal presented under Item 21 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1905)

191-22) Will Co. – Dellwood Park West Nature Preserve and Nature Preserve Buffer, Dedication

Kim Roman presented a proposal for preliminary dedication of Dellwood Park West as a nature preserve and nature preserve buffer. The Lockport Township Park District wishes to protect its unique natural communities and habitat for endangered species by dedicating approximately 32 acres of Dellwood Park West as an Illinois Nature Preserve and 81 acres of the site as dedicated buffer. Dellwood Park West is a 196-acre site owned by the Lockport Township Park District and occurs in the Morainal Section of the Northeastern Morainal Natural Division. The northern 25 acres is recognized as Lockport Prairie East on the INAI (#14) for its dolomite prairie habitat which harbors the state and federally endangered leafy prairie clover (Dalea foliosa). In addition, the state- endangered Butler’s quillwort (Isoetes butleri) was recently discovered here. While the quality of Lockport Prairie East has declined since its original inventory in 1977, a recent grant allowed for the implementation of a large-scale management and restoration plan. Dolomite prairie and savanna, and sedge meadow remnants are still present, and the quality of these communities has been increasing over recent years with aggressive management.
Ms. Roman stated that the Lockport Township Park District reserves the right to construct a multi-use trail in the buffer area only where interpretive signs and kiosks can be placed. This site is north of Joliet and is a highly urbanizing area.

It was moved by Riddell, seconded by Allread, and carried that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants preliminary approval for the dedication of Dellwood Park West in Will County as an Illinois Nature Preserve, as described in the proposal presented under Item 22 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1906)

191-23) Lake Co. – Jean Farwell Woods Addition of Buffer (Farwell Parcel) to Middlefork Savanna
Nature Preserve, Dedication
(Actually Presented after Item 14)

Steven Byers presented a proposal for final dedication of the Jean Farwell Woods addition of buffer to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve. The 5-acre Jean Farwell Woods buffer addition to Middlefork Savanna Nature Presrve is owned by Frank Farwell and occurs in the Morainal Section of the Northeastern Morainal Natural Division. This 5-acre parcel includes surviving elements of mesic savanna that extend from Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve and transition into dry-mesic forest (INAI #1245). The Jean Farwell Woods buffer addition to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve was one of three parcels presented to the INPC at its 190th Meeting in May, 2006, on behalf of John Lillard and Frank Farwell. At that meeting, the Commission conferred preliminary approval for Lillard parcel #2 (3.162 acres) and the Farwell parcel (5 acres) (Resolution #1875), and tabled granting preliminary approval for dedication of Lillard parcel #1 (12.692 acres). This parcel is one of five parcels presented at the 191st Meeting of the INPC that will increase the amount of land formally protected at Middlefork Savanna from 581.8 acres to 602.954 acres.

It was moved by Flemel, seconded by Schwegman, and carried, with Riddell abstaining, that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants final approval for the dedication of the Jean Farwell Woods addition of buffer (Farwell parcel) to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve in Lake County, as described in the proposal presented under Item 23 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1907)

191-24) Lake Co. – Jean Farwell Woods Addition of Buffer (Lillard Parcel #2) to Middlefork
Savanna Nature Preserve, Dedication

Steven Byers presented a proposal for final dedication of the Jean Farwell Woods addition of buffer to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve. The 3.162-acre Jean Farwell Woods buffer addition to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve is owned by Paula Polk Lillard, as trustee for the Paula Polk Lillard Trust, and occurs in the Morainal Section of the Northwestern Morainal Natural Division. This 3.162-acre parcel includes surviving elements of mesic savanna that extend from Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve and transition into dry-mesic forest (INAI #1245). The Jean Farwell Woods buffer addition to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve is one of three parcels presented to the INPC at its 190th Meeting in May, 2006, on behalf of John Lillard and Frank Farwell. At that meeting, the Commission conferred preliminary approval for Lillard parcel #2 (3.162 acres) (Resolution #1876) and the Farwell parcel (5 acres), and tabled granting preliminary approval for dedication of Lillard parcel #1 (12.692 acres). This parcel is one of five parcels presented to the 191st Meeting of the INPC that will increase the amount of land formally protected at Middlefork Savanna from 581.8 acres to 602.954 acres.

It was moved by Schwegman, seconded by Allread, and carried that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants final approval for the dedication of the Jean Farwell Woods addition of buffer (Lillard parcel #2) to Middlefork Savanna Nature Preserve in Lake County, as described in the proposal presented under Item 24 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1908)

Chair Ross-Shannon thanked Mr. Lillard and Mr. Mohr for their efforts. He asked Mr. Byers to convey the thanks of the Commission to Mr. Farwell.

191-25) Randolph Co. – Swayne Hollow Nature Preserve, Dedication
(Actually presented after Item 18)

Judy Faulkner Dempsey presented a proposal for final dedication of Swayne Hollow as a nature preserve. The proposed Swayne Hollow Nature Preserve comprises approximately one half of the Swayne Hollow INAI site (#827). The Nature Conservancy wishes to dedicate the 88 acres in their ownership as an Illinois Nature Preserve. Swayne Hollow is located in the Central Section of the Ozark Natural Division and is included on the INAI as a Category II site for threatened and endangered species and the presence of the state-threatened yellow honeysuckle (Lonicera flava) which occurs on an undisturbed sandstone cliff community. Notable features include relict plant species. Swayne Hollow is significant primarily due to the presence of the federally threatened small whorled pogonia orchid (Isotria medeoloides) which is the only known population of this plant in Illinois. The orchid has not been observed since 1991, but extended dormancy is characteristic for this species. The relict plant species that occur at Swayne Hollow include shining clubmoss (Lycopodium lucidulum), ground pine (Lycopodium flabelliforme), chokecherry (Prunus virginiana), interrupted fern (Osmunda claytoniana), and cinnamon fern (Osmunda cinnamomea), all occurring on the north-facing grade A sandstone cliff community. The Commission conferred preliminary approval for dedication at the Commission’s 190th Meeting in May, 2006 (Resolution #1877).

Commissioner Schwegman stated that this is a unique site because it was covered by the Illinois glaciers, and there is a chance that the whorled pogonia orchid could recur.

Ms. Faulkner Dempsey thanked Mr. and Mrs. Swayne for bringing their children to the meeting and showing them that this important to their family. Mr. Swayne has taken a strong interest in wanting to make sure the site is protected as his father wished it would be.

It was moved by Schwegman, seconded by Allread, and carried, with Drucker abstaining, that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants final approval for the dedication of Swayne Hollow in Randolph County as an Illinois Nature Preserve, as described in the proposal presented under Item 25 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1909)

Commissioner Allread stated that she also wanted to commend the Swaynes for bringing their family.

Jeff Swayne stated that when his mother was sick with cancer, she made him promise that he would never let the State "get their grubby little hands on that property." He stated that this is a bit emotional for him because this property is very dear to his heart, and he would never want to see anything bad happen to it. He stated that his parents never got to meet any of his children or his wife, but when the family goes to Herrin, they still have his parents house. He feels that his parents are there in spirit. He stated that he knows that in order to protect this land, it needed to be held in something that would allow it to be set aside and never developed. From what he has been told by Ms. Faulkner Dempsey and the research that he has done, he felt like this was the very best way to go about that. He stated that he appreciated very much the Commission’s acceptance of the property as a nature preserve and hopes that the Commission continues its good work.

191-26) McHenry Co. – Proposed Equestrian Trail and Vehicle Access at Black Crown Marsh Land
and Water Reserve
(Actually presented after Item 22)

Greg Kelly, Site Superintendent of Moraine Hills State Park, stated that IDNR, owner of the Black Crown Marsh Land and Water Reserve, proposes to construct an equestrian and dog sled trail within the Land and Water Reserve. This project will develop 2.56 miles of trails for equestrian and dog sled use on former agricultural fields (now in farm lease program for hay production) and successional growth areas. The trail system will consist of two connected loops and a short access spur. Trails will have grass surface. Where encountered, brush will be cleared; trees will be avoided. Wetlands and hydric soils will also be avoided.

A short roadway and a cul-de-sac with gravel surface, located at a former farmstead, will provide vehicular access at the trailhead. Foundations of former buildings will be removed to construct the road and cul-de-sac. Parking will be accommodated on grass surfaces adjacent to the cul-de-sac, outside of the Land and Water Reserve.

The trail system and vehicular access are located within the Black Crown Marsh Land and Water Reserve (INAI site #1503). The IDNR’s District 7 Natural Heritage Biologist will incorporate the trails and vehicular access into the Land and Water Reserve’s three-year management plan and submit the plan to the INPC for review/approval. Management of equestrian and dog sled uses will include time and date restrictions based on use of the wetlands by migratory waterfowl and endangered or threatened species, e.g., the south loop will be closed during portions of the spring and fall seasons.

Mr. Kelly stated that McHenry County has one of the highest per capita horse ownership ratios in the State. Horseback riding access on public land, however, is very limited. Mr. Kelly stated that after taking on the responsibility of the Superintendent position at Moraine Hills State Park and getting acclimated with the site and the surroundings, he discovered that there was some ongoing equestrian activity in the hay fields at Black Crown Marsh Land and Water Reserve. He approached the private stable owner and advised them that this was not an approved activity. Mr. Kelly stated that he inspected the property in question which was primarily old farm lanes which serve as perimeters to the hay fields that on the property. He stated that he did not see any real impacts to the area, and felt that this activity was a compatible activity for that property. He stated that he met with Brad Semel, John Nelson, and Ray Eisbrener to discuss this type of activity to try to determine if it would be a feasible use. After this discussion, it was decided to bring the proposal before the Commission. He stated that the constituent demand is great for the equestrian trail and the dog sled trail.

John Nelson stated that this is a three-year trial, and the uses will be evaluated after the three years. A report will be submitted to the INPC staff, and a decision will be made to either continue or discontinue the use. The northern loop would be open year-round. The southern loop use will be seasonal. The wetland basin is to the south. Black Crown Marsh was a target for protection because of the wetland-dependent birds. The concentration of rare birds is to the south, and that is why the south trail will be closed at the breeding and nesting season. No foot traffic will be allowed on the trails. He stated that staff have inspected the areas and have looked at the trail alignments. Some changes have been made to avoid areas that may be too soft. The trail is on the perimeter of the upland areas, and it is intentionally designed like that to minimize disturbance to any wildlife. The trail follows old fence rows. He stated that staff is recommending approval of this use for the three-year trial period.

Chair Ross-Shannon asked how the trail use will be enforced.

Mr. Kelly stated that the parking lot will be gated and signs will be posted. There will be constant monitoring of the site, consistent with the management of the rest of the site. The parking lot will only hold a certain number of trucks with trailers which will limit the amount of activity the site will have. There will also be times of temporary closure because of the weather.
Mr. Nelson stated that fencing will also be placed on the new acquisition. There have been problems with ATVs which causes much more disturbance than there ever has been from the equestrian traffic that would be associated with this site. Since the IDNR acquired this parcel, it has not been open to the public. Some of the funds that were used to acquire the parcel were Land and Water Conservation (LAWCON) funds, and associated with that grant, is some type of public use or recreational activity. If the Commission approves this use, it will be used to justify the expenditure of those funds to acquire the parcel by the IDNR.

Randy Heidorn stated that after reviewing the information, he recommended approval of the three-year trial because of the monitoring that will be done of the site. If the monitoring shows impact to the birds, the program will be discontinued. He felt that appropriate safeguards have been developed.

Commissioner Drucker asked staff to comment on their doubts and concerns about why this use would not be appropriate.

Mr. Heidorn stated that his biggest concern was disturbance of nesting species and that the activity would grow out of proportion to the point where the area could not handle it. The size of the parking lot will limit that use.

Mr. Kelly stated that the owner of the horse farm adjacent to the site will be contacted to negotiate a licensing agreement to allow access from their property onto the trail system. This type of agreement is not unusual to the Department. There are a number of private entities that have been granted license agreements to enter onto a trail system from their property. Certain stipulations will have to be negotiated, such number of horses on the trail at any given time and a sign-in box. This will be completed before the trail is opened. Mr. Kelly stated that there is still a lot of work that needs to be done before the trail opens.

Jerry Paulson stated that if the use is established for three years, a constituency will be built, and it will be very difficult to discontinue the use. He stated that the Commission should understand that once this use is approved, it will be there for a long time. He feels the safeguards discussed today are good, and the use can be managed, but he feels it would be very difficult to stop the use.

Mr. Kelly stated that the constituents that he has talked with understand that this is something that is on a trial basis. The constituents want to do the right thing and make sure the area is not abused. He will be working with the group on a regular basis.

Debbie Newman asked if the issue has been raised regarding the spread of exotic species by the horses.

Mr. Kelly stated that the issue was discussed with Brad Semel and John Nelson. At this point it is not expected to be a problem.

Mr. Nelson stated that the site has a fair number of invasive species. It is not a Category I site. The vegetation communities are considered to be low-grade, highly degraded.

Commissioner Drucker asked what portion of Black Crown Marsh Land and Water Reserve could qualify as a nature preserve.

Mr. Nelson stated that the lower portion could be recommended for dedication because of the threatened or endangered bird species that are using the wetlands. Buffer would be a good use for the northern portion if the landowner so chose to go that direction.

Commissioner Allread asked how long is the proposed trail, and how long is the trail if the seasonal loop is not included. She stated that she is most concerned about the impact to the birds in the seasonal loop and that it is right along the edge of a very sensitive area.

Mr. Kelly stated that the trail is approximately 2.5 miles long. The seasonal loop makes up approximately one-third of the total trail system. Mr. Kelly again reiterated that the seasonal loop will be closed during the sensitive breeding and nesting times. He stated that the birds do not use the area in the summer. The basin is usually dry in the summer.

Valerie Spale stated that erosion on the horse trails in the Shawnee has been a problem, and she asked if that has been taken into consideration at this site. She also asked who is going to clean up after the horses and dogs.

Mr. Kelly stated that 99% of this trail system is on flat, grassy farm lanes. There will be no erosion. As far as clean up after the animals, there will be a manure collection facility at the east area. There will be no clean up on the trail. The owners will be required to clean up after themselves in the parking area. He has talked with the president of the dog association, and the owners make sure that the area is cleaned and material disposed of properly. He stated that he does not anticipate this will be an issue.

Mr. Heidorn stated that horse trails are allowed in nature preserves, but generally horse trails are brought in at the time of the dedication. This site is unique because it is a land and water reserve, and this use was not conceived at the time.

It was moved by Flemal, seconded by Riddell, with Allread and Drucker opposing. The vote carried 4 to 2 that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission grants approval of the trail proposal for a three-year trial period as presented under Item 26 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting. The Illinois Department of Natural Resources will monitor the impacts of the trail programs and provide its findings annually to the Commission. After the three-year trial, the Illinois Department of Natural Resources will prepare a summary report and ask for final approval of the trail.

(Resolution 1910)
191-27) Vegetation Management Guidelines

The Management Guidelines give landowners and managers guidance on how to address a land management issue in a nature preserve or land and water reserve. Once approved by the Commission, they become part of the policy guidance used by staff to review and approve management plans. Updated Vegetation Management Guidelines for the control of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) and winter creeper (Euonymus fortunei) were presented for approval. The guidelines were submitted to INPC Consultants and Advisors and to selected natural area land managers for review. Recommended changes were incorporated into the documents.

Bob Edgin stated that Management Guidelines manual was originally developed in 1990. It served two purposes; provide landowners and managers with guidelines on how to deal with specific issues on nature preserves and provide policy guidance to the Springfield and field staff as the management plans are developed for the nature preserves and land and water reserves. Due to the age of the original manual, it was decided to start updating and revising the guidelines. The manual contains five volumes with two supplements. Volume I deals with the vegetation management guidelines. Volumes II and III deal with facility management and development. Volume IV deals with herbicide use and application as it applies to nature preserves and land and water reserves. Volume V deals with control of animal populations. The two supplements deal with a garlic mustard alert and the Illinois plant translocation and restoration policy.

The vegetation management guidelines consists of 40 sections. Section 1 deals with vegetation management in general. Section 2 deals with vegetation management via the guidelines, purpose, and how to use them. Thirty-eight sections deal with vegetation guidelines for species or groups of species. Twenty-five updated guidelines have been approved by the Commission. Seven guidelines are in the process of being revised. Six guidelines are yet to be revised. He stated that over the course of the next five Commission meetings, it is hoped that this revision process will be finalized.

Mr. Edgin stated that quaking aspen is a medium size tree with a short, rounded crown. When it is young, it has a light green or yellowish green bark. The bark becomes white as it matures. The twigs are usually slender and drooping. The leaves are dark green and shiny. The tree obtained its name because the leaves flutter in the slightest breeze due to long, flattened, slender leafstalks.
This tree forms very dense colonies that shade out desirable vegetation. The tree thrives in full sun. Management recommendations are girdling, followed by application of herbicide. Cutting the tree and applying herbicide and basal bark treatment also works well. The root system has to be eliminated. He stated that a single prescribed burn can be detrimental because the roots will send up resprouts. The quaking aspen update was written by Kelly Neal and Eric Smith.

Mr. Edgin stated that winter creeper is an evergreen, woody, clinging vine. The plant is used extensively in landscaping. The plant will thrive in full sun, but it will also tolerate fairly deep shade once it has become established. Management recommendations include hand pulling for small stands, but this needs to be done when the soil is fairly moist and loose. Chemical control can also be done by cutting the stems close to the ground and immediately treating with herbicide. All portions of the plant, including the stem fragments, roots, and seeds, should be removed from the site in trash bags or burned to prevent re-establishments. He stated that a single cutting or mowing will not work and induce root sprouting. Mr. Edgin stated that the winter creeper update was written by Judy Faulkner Dempsey and himself.

Commissioner Keating stated that the trembling aspen is now known as the world’s largest single living organism. There is a clone in Utah that covers hundreds of square acres and has an estimated bio mass, including the roots, of some tens of thousands of tons.

It was moved by Allread, seconded by Keating, and carried that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission approves the revised vegetation management guidelines for quaking aspen and winter creeper as presented under Item 27 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1911)

191-28) Natural Areas Acquisition Stewardship Project List, Approval

The Natural Areas Stewardship project uses monies provided by the Natural Areas Acquisition Fund (10% of land acquisition budget) to fund management activities on both state-owned and private nature preserves and land and water reserves. In FY07, $600,000 will be available for natural areas stewardship needs statewide. There was approximately $50,000 from FY06 that will be available for FY07.

Bob Szafoni stated that the Commissioners were provided a list of proposed projects. Management is critical to maintaining resources for which the land was acquired and protected. Projects were submitted by INPC and IDNR staff. The projects that were selected were done so based on the priorities given by the field staff. He stated that 30 projects have been proposed on IDNR-owned sites and 19 non-IDNR-owned sites. An additional 77 projects are listed but are currently unfunded.

Mr. Szafoni stated that 41 projects deal with the control of invasive and exotic species. Four projects will address native vegetative planting, and four other projects will address site integrity needs such has boundary fencing, erosion control, and removal of old dumps. Ten of the projects that have been proposed will also be bringing in match dollars in the amount of $125,000, typically from federal sources. In additional to the $465,000 in site specific projects, the stewardship component also allows $180,000 to INPC staff and IDNR field staff to do discretionary stewardship projects. This allows staff to address emergency issues or to be able to take advantage of other cost share opportunities that may become available. The stewardship project also provides $5,000 in support to the Volunteer Stewardship Network (VSN). The VSN is a cooperative venture of The Nature Conservancy and the INPC. This money is used to fund small grants to local groups who are helping to manage the stewardship of natural areas.

Chair Ross-Shannon stated that the $5 million statutory transfer is money that could be used for land acquisition or stewardship. He stated that it was his understanding that the money gets transferred because it is not appropriated. He asked if there is a way to earmark the funds so the money can be appropriated to specific projects.

Mr. Szafoni stated that the INPC and the Division of Natural Heritage staff are working at peak capacity. It is difficult to spend a great deal of time putting together stewardship projects, which may be needed, but will not be able to compete for a small amount of money. While it may look like the IDNR is unable to fund all the projects, it is just the tip of the iceberg. If there was a systematic inventory of stewardship needs of all protected nature preserves and land and water reserves, significant resources would be needed.

Randy Heidorn stated that there are two things that are limiting the processes; the actual dollar amount that is available, and the staff component. The practical part of administering the project adds up quickly. Additional staff is needed to cover the open districts. The resident program will help, and the funding for that is coming out of the operations side of the NAAF.

Randy Nyboer stated that there are two ways to have more NAAF dollars. One way is to increase the amount of money either by reducing the amount in the statutory transfers or increase the overall amount that could be appropriated. There is more than $17.7 million in the NAAF, but that is how much is going to be appropriated according to budget requests.

Commissioner Riddell stated that she shares the ESPB’s concern with the statutory transfer from the NAAF. She stated that if there was a point to sending a similar letter to the Governor expressing the Commission’s position regarding the statutory transfer, she would be in favor of doing so.

Chair Ross-Shannon asked for ideas on how the Commission could voice its opinion regarding the statutory transfers from the NAAF.

Mr. Nyboer stated that the ESPB decided to put forth the resolution because of the resources that the Board covers for the mandated, statutory programs. The Board felt that it needed to be done to make people aware that the Board has no funding. In 2000, the ESPB had a $270,000 budget with three staff.

Commissioner Drucker stated that Deborah Stone is working to raise the visibility of the INPC and the value of its work within the IDNR. The IDNR is the entity that seeks money to for the projects. He stated that the INPC has to lobby its cause within the Department through press releases, letters, and through other functions. The Commissioners, as individuals, can talk with their elected Representatives and let them know that the money is there and to support the amount requested by the IDNR. He stated that the INPC must also depend on staff to bring to the Commission what is needed so the INPC can get in early in the budgeting process.

It was moved by Drucker, seconded by Allread, and carried that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission approves the natural areas acquisition stewardship project list as presented under Item 28 of the Agenda for the 191st Meeting.

(Resolution 1912)

Chair Ross-Shannon asked Mr. Szafoni if he could prepare for the Commissioners at the Commission’s staff meeting in February, 2007, an educational presentation regarding the problems the staff are facing in regards to stewardship.

Mr. Szafoni stated that he would put together the information requested and present it to the Commissioners at the staff meeting in February, 2007.

191-29) Public Comment Period (3 minutes per person)

Al Wilson, volunteer steward at Lake in the Hills Fen Nature Preserve, stated that he wanted to thank John Nelson and Brad Semel for their help in addressing the problems of napweed at the Nature Preserve. He stated that they have used over 100 gallons of Transline mix. Fifty gallons were used in just one day. He stated that it takes man hours and tools to be able to do the stewardship, and stated other stewards need the tools to do the necessary stewardship of their sites. He stated that he spends a lot of his own money towards stewardship of Lake in the Hills Fen Nature Preserve, but he is also fortunate to get the herbicide from the IDNR. He asked that the Commission take into consideration the tools and materials needed for the volunteer stewards when formulating its budget.

Chair Ross-Shannon thanked Mr. Wilson for his comments. He stated that the volunteer stewards are crucial to the management of the nature preserves and land and water reserves.

Valerie Spale stated that he wanted to bring the Commission up-to-date on a situation at Wolf Road Prairie Nature Preserve. She stated that a developer has received approval from the Village of Westchester to build on property that is identified as buffer by the Forest Preserve District of Cook County. Access to the site will be by an old dedicated road that is part of Wolf Road Prairie. Prior to their approval, the Forest Preserve District of Cook County passed an ordinance vacating those old streets that were never developed. The developer is in the process of applying for grants and permits through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers because there is a small area of wetland that would be impacted if the road would to go through. She stated that she was hoping that the Commission would consider writing a letter to the Forest Preserve District of Cook County supporting their efforts in vacating the streets and alleys and offering any assistance or support in defense of that property to prevent the destruction of the property.

Jerry Paulson, Natural Land Institute, stated that Congress passed the changes to the Internal Revenue Code that will make it possible to gain more value out of a donation of a conservation easement or land and water reserve easement. The changes will extend the period of time a person can take the deduction from three years to 15 years, and it will increase it to 50% of the person’s adjusted gross income. If the person is a qualified farmer or rancher, the person can claim 100% of their annual gross income as a charitable donation for an easement. The changes were tacked onto the pension reform bill, but the changes are something that the land trust movement, The Nature Conservancy, and other groups have been working on for years. He stated that this is another tool for staff to use.

Nancy Williamson stated that she works with the IDNR’s C2000 program. She stated that she wanted to remind staff that the C2000 program can be another tool when doing stewardship projects. Region 1 has a bobcat with several attachments that can be used, however, a truck is needed to pull the trailer. Contractual money can be saved by borrowing equipment for stewardship.

George Johnson stated that he has been a natural areas steward for approximately 25 years, and he has been active in mostly private efforts. He stated he has had relatively little to do with nature preserves as such, but he would like to address the Commission regarding the impacts of its decisions. He stated that the decision the Commission makes and the preserves that it sets aside, are basically what he uses to point out in any lobbying or meetings before County Boards or municipalities in terms of getting regulations made. The Commission’s guidelines are followed when making these recommendations. He works with privately held prairie remnants and savannas that may never be brought before the Commission. When he writes a grant or a grant appeal, he uses the Commission’s guidelines, and he feels this is an important resource.

Mr. Johnson stated that he would like to suggest that the Commission look at adding more emphasis on vernal pools that occur in existing nature preserves and adding criteria for the dedication of sites which have vernal pools and surrounding amphibian habitat.

191-30) Other Business

Joe Roth, CorLands, provided each Commissioner with an eight-page memo to Deborah Stone, dated August 8, 2006, and a three-page letter to Ms. Stone, also dated August 8, 2006, summarizing the Material Service Corporation Settlement Fund (MSCSF) and the restoration projects that CorLands has been involved with. He stated that CorLands is a land preservation affiliate of the Open Lands Project.

Mr. Roth stated that he congratulated Kim Roman on the preliminary dedication of Delwood Park West in Will County. This project was funded from MSCSF. The last of the dedications required of sites under the MSCSF program, will come before the Commission in October, 2006. The MSCSF is the result of the largest wetland violation in the United States. The settlement resulted in the partnership between the Chicago District of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers and CorLands that was initiated in 2000. At the onset, the MSCSF had a deadline of 2007. One accomplishment is that approximately 2,635 acres in south Cook and Will counties have been, or are in the process of being, added to the Illinois Nature Preserves System either through nature preserve dedication, nature preserve buffer dedication, or land and water reserve registration. He stated that he would like to thank the Commission for its partnership in this endeavor, and he stated that he hopes the partnership can be continued by adding more land to the Nature Preserves System and helping with the long-term sustainment of the sites that are in the program.

Mr. Roth stated that CorLands has been involved with Black Crown Marsh Land and Water Reserve for quite sometime. He stated that within the next 60 days that it is hoped that partnerships, which have been in the works in a number of years, will result in the existing Land and Water Reserve property being more than doubled in size to a total of approximately 470 acres. The Lake County Forest Preserve District has bought into its part of the partnership at the cost of $6.3 million. CorLands is presently working with other partners to secure those remaining properties.

Chair Ross-Shannon thanked Mr. Roth for the great work that he has done.

Chair Ross-Shannon stated that the Commission has been asked to take some form of action regarding Wolf Road Prairie Nature Preserve. He stated that it would be his recommendation that some type of written summary be submitted to staff with a request of the type of action being sought from the Commission.

Valerie Spale stated that Steven Byers is very familiar with the situation, and he has been before the Village Board to supply an opposition to this development. She suggested that she could meet with Mr. Byers, and Mr. Byers could provide the Commissioners with the requested information. Ms. Spale stated that this issue is time sensitive because the permits are in the process of being requested. She urged the Commission to take action on this matter prior to its next meeting scheduled in October, 2006.

Mr. Byers stated that the Forest Preserve District of Cook County has discussed this issue with him, and the District has taken a strong position on the vacating of the streets at Wolf Road Prairie. He stated that a latter from the Commission in support of the District’s actions is recommended.

It was moved by Allread, seconded by Drucker, and carried that the following resolution be adopted:

The Commission supports the Forest Preserve District of Cook County’s effort to vacate the roadways at Wolf Road Prairie which will offer further protection to Wolf Road Prairie Nature Preserve.

(Resolution 1913)

191-31) Adjournment

It was moved by Flemal, seconded by Allread, and unanimously approved to adjourn. The meeting was adjourned at 3:35 p.m.

 

 

 

Illinois Nature Preserves Commission
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Springfield, IL 62702
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